“Up and over the fence” and other strange phrases used by photographers.

Every profession has it’s own jargon and technical terms that sound strange and nonsensical to those not working within the industry. Photography is no exception, and in fact photographers can be some of the biggest culprits. However, aside from the “everyday” photography terms such as aperture and shutter speed, there are some rather amusing phrases that even I think sound ridiculous to the uninitiated!

Below I have listed some of the phrases you may or may not have heard a photographer say in your presence and a short description of what they actually mean.

Up and over the fence

Nope we are not talking about how to get away from a particularity difficult client (although I’m sure we’ve all been there)! “Up and over the fence” is a phrase used primarily when shooting head shots to help eliminate double chins (even for those who don’t necessarily have one).  Often, people’s natural inclination when being photographed is to pull their face away from the lens and draw their chin into their neck, thus creating a double-chin effect. Asking people to push their chin forward then results in a gurning face as the chin is lifted unflattering in the air. Instead, I ask my clients to imagine that there is a fence that just reaches the bottom of their chin, and to lift their chin over the top so that the chin is on the opposite side of the fence to the neck. This elongates the neck, separating it from the chin and creates a defined jawline that is slimming and flattering.

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A strong jawline is slimming and flattering and sometimes we need to use a little imagination to create the right pose for this.

The Decisive Moment

This phrase was coined by famous street photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson. It relates to pressing the shutter button at the precise time everything in the image comes together and creates the perfect photograph. Whilst this often still relates to street photography, timing is important to taking the perfect shot in all genres – it could be the exact moment you start to smile naturally and relax in you head shot shoot, or could be capturing a moment in time at a corporate event.

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Timing is everything – especially at action-packed events.

The golden hour

Now I’m sure most of you will have heard of this term and many will even know what it refers to. The golden hour is (in general terms) the first hour after sunrise and the last hour before sunset where the sunlight is low in the sky, soft and golden. This lighting provides optimum conditions for both landscape images and portraiture as the contrast between highlights and shadows is not too extreme, but enough to convey shape and depth, in and around the subject matter.

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Photos taken during the golden hour have a much subtler contrast between highlights and shadows.

Feathering the light

Feathering light relates to the position of the subject in relation to the light source. Instead of aiming the light directly at the subject (or placing the subject directly in the light if using natural light), feathering the light involves placing the subject at the edge of the light source to create softer and more subtle lighting. For example, it would be the difference between standing in front of a car’s headlights, or standing on the pavement on the edge of where the headlights illuminate the space ahead. This is a popular technique across a range of photography genres, especially when seeking to create a more sensual feel to the image.

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On the edge – feathering the light can create an ethereal atmosphere in an image. Here the subject had already positioned himself on the edge of the light source and the result was too good not to photograph .

Bouncing the flash 

At events, the one question I get asked more than any other is “Why aren’t you pointing that flash in the right direction?” This answer is simple – using flash directly on a subject causes flat harsh lighting with red eyes and dark shadows. Instead, by pointing the flash to the ceiling or a nearby wall, the light is “bounced” off this larger surface and reflects back softer; creating flattering lighting. If done correctly, bounced flash can be hard to spot and is a great technique when time and lack of space may limit more complex lighting setups being utilised.

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Bouncing the flash off a ceiling or wall is far more flattering than pointing it directly at the subject. Here there are no red eyes and no distracting shadows behind.

Hyperfocal distance

Now I could I could get really nerdy here, but that’s not really my nature so I will keep it very simple. The hyperfocal distance of a scene, is the distance a photographer needs to focus his lens at, in order for everything in the image to be sharp. This usually relates to landscape photography where an object in the foreground (a gate or a wall for example) needs to be as pin sharp as the object in the background (a hill or mountain etc.). The scientific amongst us can calculate exactly what that focus needs to be based on maths and science – the rest of us use an app!!

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When everything in the scene needs to be sharp, hyperfocal focussing is the answer.

Just one more

Question: How many photographers does it take to change a lightbulb? Answer: Just one more! It’s an old joke but does highlight one of the most overused phrases in the industry. Why do we always ask for one more shot even after we have the perfect image? For some, it’s simply to really make sure the image is captured and we have several shots to choose from when editing, for others it’s a bad habit that is hard to get out of. I tend to say this when clients are starting to relax and the images are looking better and better with each shot. Sometimes the best image can be the very last one taken so whilst I don’t like keeping people longer than they feel comfortable, I like to keep trying new ideas from the start of the session to the very end.

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Just one more – taking photos can be addictive and we don’t always know when to stop!

These are just some of the strange photographic terms you may have heard or hear in the future – are there any other terms or phrases you have heard but don’t understand? If so comment below and I will endeavour to make sense of them for you.

In the meantime, have a great week.

Ross

Ross Willsher is a social (weddings and portraits) and commercial photographer based in Chelmsford and covering Essex and London, who is passionate about creating images as individual as you are.  His work can be viewed at www.rosswillsherphotography.co.uk / www.rosswillshercommercialphotography.co.uk 

facebook.com/rosswillsherphotography | @RWIllsherPhoto | instagram.com/rosswillsherphotography

 

 

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“Up and over the fence” and other strange phrases used by photographers.

Relax…it’s in the bag: Part 1 – The Main Camera Body

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Part 1 in a series of blog posts exploring what essential pieces of kit I keep in my bag and how each item helps to promote your brand.

Over the next few weeks I’m going to be blogging about the essential items I carry in my commercial photography kit bag and how they help me to get great shots of you and your business. For part one I thought it best to start with the most obvious piece of kit – my main camera body – the Canon 5D Mark ii.

Here are 5 features of the 5D Mark ii that help me as a commercial photographer to help you sell your brand..

1. The Full-frame Sensor

A camera’s sensor size ultimately determines how much light is captured within each image. The larger the sensor, the more light that is captured in each shot.  The 5D Mark ii is fantastic for shooting in low light situations due to it’s full-frame sensor. The large sensor also helps to capture the tiniest details in highlights and shadows as well as a broad spectrum of colours and tones.

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What this means for you.

My camera can help me to capture concerts and events using only the ambient light available in the room whilst still maintaining high quality in my images.  I have and can use an external flash unit to enhance a low light scene, but often the most interesting images can be created by utilising the Canon 5D’s ability to capture brilliant detail in far from ideal natural lighting conditions. So when you book me to cover your events you need not worry about low light at the venue – I have the equipment to overcome this and take great shots.

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2. Long Battery Life

Whilst I use fully rechargeable batteries (more on these in a future blog) and always carry spares on my shoots, I have rarely – if ever – needed to replace the battery midway through a shoot. The 5D Mark ii will take 1000 to 1500 shots before the battery needs replacing so I can shoot without fear of having to stop just when we’re getting into our photographic groove!

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What this means for you.

Sometimes it may take a while to relax during your headshot shoot or we need to keep trying different angles and poses to capture your personality. The long battery life of my camera means that we only have to stop our photography shoot when we decide we have nailed the shots and not when the camera says “Enough!”

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3. Total control over every setting.

This camera lets me take full control of every aspect of each photograph – from exposure (brightness) to how much is in focus, the image’s colour balance and whether to freeze or to blur motion.

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What this means for you.

My camera helps me to ensure that the colours and tones of your products are represented accurately in all promotional material. Using the Canon 5D, I am able to light and shoot products in a way that highlights their USP and thus increases sales of your produce or stock.

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4. Interchangeable lenses

The Canon 5D – like most DSLRs – allows me to fit and use a range of lenses according to the photograph I am taking. I will talk in a future post about what each individual lens does for me (and you). Having a camera body that fits so many top-range lenses means that I can creatively shoot from a range of distances and angles and compose shots that help to promote your brand and products.

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What this means for you.

From head shots that really capture your unique personality through to wide-angle captures of your premises or event venue, being able to switch lenses to creatively capture what is important to you is a real feature of my photography style.

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5. Custom Functions

The Canon 5D Mark ii enables me to personalise which button controls each function. For example, I use a button on the back of the camera to control focussing instead of pressing down the shutter. This means that I can work in a way that suits me best and quickly make adjustments without having to stop and look at the camera body itself.

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What this means for you.

Knowing these controls so well means I can focus my attention on you. I can check that you  are feeling relaxed and happy with how the day or shoot is going. I can help to guide your posing and answer any concerns that you may have. It also means that I can work more efficiently which – due to the fact that I charge per hour – ultimately saves you money.

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So there you go – five ways in which my camera body helps me to promote your business. To see some of the work created with this camera please take a little look at my website or get in touch if you would like my camera and I to create some images that will help you promote your USP.

In my next post I’ll be talking more specifically about my lenses and how each one makes you look your best. In the meantime, I’d love to hear any comments or suggestions for future posts.

Have a great week.

Ross

info@rosswillsherphotography.co.uk | www.rosswillshercommercialphotography.co.uk 07590 520539

Relax…it’s in the bag: Part 1 – The Main Camera Body