Heads-up! How to nail the perfect headshot

“YOU NEVER GET A SECOND CHANCE TO MAKE A FIRST IMPRESSION.”

It’s an old saying but one that is more relevant than ever before in this digital age. With Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn profiles – in addition to a professional website – now an essential part of any marketing campaign, first impressions are no longer solely made face-to-face.

Headshots are your chance to provide potential clients, casting agents or employers with the perfect first impression and to communicate in one image the person behind the brand. In order for your headshot to do this, it needs to be two things;

A) Professionally taken

A quick snap taken by a friend with their latest smartphone may seem the most cost-effective option, but aside from the compromised image quality, there is no substitute for a professional photographer’s ability to light, pose and direct you to ensure that your headshot makes the maximum impact.

B) Reflective of your personality and brand

Wearing a suit and tie and standing in front of a studio backdrop may work really well for a bank manager or accountant. However, this may not truly reflect the brand and personality of a personal trainer or actor. The location, styling and posing of your headshot needs to reflect who you are and resonate with the type of clients / audience that you are trying to attract.

It is important to find a photographer who will listen and get to know you, make you feel comfortable in front of the lens and know how to light and pose you to help you look your best.

However, your attitude and preparation to a headshot shoot can have a massive impact on its success. Below are some of the simple things that you can do to help your photographer to get a headshot that captures your unique personality.

1. Have a clear direction

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Before the shoot, think about how you want to be seen and what characteristics you want to portray. If you are a performer think about the types of roles or performances that you want to be cast in. Are you seeking roles as a villain or a leading love interest? Are you an opera singer or a rock musician? The slightest change in expression and intensity of the eyes can change how you look in your headshot so be clear about what you are wanting from the shoot and share this with the phtographer before the session.

This applies just as much (if not more) to business headshots – what are you trying to say about yourself and your brand? You may want to appear friendly, warm and approachable or appear more authoritative and convey a strong sense of leadership.

2. Wear clothes that compliment you and your brand

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Choose clothes that are comfortable and help you to feel relaxed. Again, think about the audience and what you are trying to convey. Choose colours that compliment your eyes or skin tone – pastels look good on fair skin types with blue eyes, whilst rustic colours (brown, green, orange) compliment green eyes. If you have dark eyes, most colours work well providing they contrast your skin tone.

The strength of Emma’s headshot above is not only down to her beautiful smile but also due to the colours of her outfit complimenting the earthy tones of the natural backdrop.

White or black tops can look a little too contrasting, whilst shirts or blouses with a collar frame the face neatly. However, rules are there to be broken and it all comes down to your personal style. Depending on the look you are going for you may want to avoid high-necked tops that don’t flatter the jawline or low cut tops that are too revealing. If appropriate, a bright scarf or cardigan may add that all important splash of colour that makes your headshot stand out from the crowd – especially if this colour matches your logo and marketing materials.

I always allow clients to bring more than one outfit if they are unsure or want a variety of looks.

3. Practice

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Spend some time before the shoot looking in the mirror trying different expressions – see what you think works for you. I help to guide clients on the day but it never hurts to arrive with an idea of how you look when making various expressions and an understanding of which expressions give a stronger sense of your personality.

4. Talk to your photographer

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Before the shoot, make the photographer aware of any concerns or worries you have – let them know anything you feel self-conscious about. During the shoot, don’t be afraid to suggest ideas and provide feedback on the shots taken so far. Only you can decide whether a shot truly reflects you or not and a good photographer will love hearing your input. The session is a collaborative process – not simply the photographer giving directions to you – so be honest and open.

5. Keep posing simple

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There are unlimited ways of posing and your photographer should provide gentle advice and direction. However, we are not looking for a Vogue cover shot on a headshot shoot and simple works best. This shot of Opera singer Peter is simple in pose and composition but incredibly powerful and perfect for use in concert programmes.

Some general rules to flatter your facial features include keeping your shoulders back and relaxed, and making sure your core (tummy) muscles are tight to support your posture. To avoid double chins appearing in your photos (regardless of whether you have one or not), roll your shoulders back, try to bring your forehead forward towards the camera and tilt it down a little (think “up and over the fence”). This stretches the neck, smooths out any lines and separates the jawline from the neck itself. As result your face will appear slimmer and more defined. Again, you can practice this before the shoot if you are unsure.

6. Be open-minded

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Headshots can incorporate a variety of styles now and so we can try several ideas in a session to get the look you are after. A good photographer won’t ask you to do anything that makes you feel uncomfortable but don’t limit yourself by not being open to suggestions. The shot above of Belinda was taken right at the end of the shoot when we decided to try one more pose and style before we brought the session to an end. We hadn’t planned to shoot Belinda in her hat and scarf but as soon Belinda put these back on, her posture and expressions became much more relaxed and we decided that this shot caught her true personality better than all the previous shots we had taken.

7. Think about the eyes

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A good headshot is all about the eyes and connecting with the viewer. Look into the camera as if the lens is a person viewing your headshot for the first time (a casting agent or potential client) and think about how you would persuade them to hire you and what you want that first impression to be.

8. Don’t be afraid to laugh

Headshots are important and can have a huge impact on your publicity but that doesn’t mean the process should be dull and monotonous. Allow yourself to laugh when it doesn’t go right first time, be willing to try different ideas and enjoy the break from sorting emails, learning lines or chairing another meeting. Trust me – you’ll soon wish you were back in front of the camera.

Looking for a new headshot? I would love to hear from you. Please do not hesitate to call 07590 520 539 or email info@rosswillsherphotography.co.uk to chat to me about your headshot needs. Alternatively visit my website to view more of my work and contact me via the online form.

Have a great week

Ross

 

Ross Willsher is a social (weddings and portraits) and commercial photographer based in Chelmsford and covering Essex and London, who is passionate about creating images as individual as you are.

His work can be viewed at http://www.rosswillsherphotography.co.uk / http://www.rosswillshercommercialphotography.co.uk

info@rosswillsherphotography.co.uk | 07590 520539

facebook.com/rosswillsherphotography | @RWillsherPhoto | instagram.com/rosswillsherphotography | http://www.linkedin.com/in/rosswillsher/

Heads-up! How to nail the perfect headshot

“Up and over the fence” and other strange phrases used by photographers.

Every profession has it’s own jargon and technical terms that sound strange and nonsensical to those not working within the industry. Photography is no exception, and in fact photographers can be some of the biggest culprits. However, aside from the “everyday” photography terms such as aperture and shutter speed, there are some rather amusing phrases that even I think sound ridiculous to the uninitiated!

Below I have listed some of the phrases you may or may not have heard a photographer say in your presence and a short description of what they actually mean.

Up and over the fence

Nope we are not talking about how to get away from a particularity difficult client (although I’m sure we’ve all been there)! “Up and over the fence” is a phrase used primarily when shooting head shots to help eliminate double chins (even for those who don’t necessarily have one).  Often, people’s natural inclination when being photographed is to pull their face away from the lens and draw their chin into their neck, thus creating a double-chin effect. Asking people to push their chin forward then results in a gurning face as the chin is lifted unflattering in the air. Instead, I ask my clients to imagine that there is a fence that just reaches the bottom of their chin, and to lift their chin over the top so that the chin is on the opposite side of the fence to the neck. This elongates the neck, separating it from the chin and creates a defined jawline that is slimming and flattering.

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A strong jawline is slimming and flattering and sometimes we need to use a little imagination to create the right pose for this.

The Decisive Moment

This phrase was coined by famous street photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson. It relates to pressing the shutter button at the precise time everything in the image comes together and creates the perfect photograph. Whilst this often still relates to street photography, timing is important to taking the perfect shot in all genres – it could be the exact moment you start to smile naturally and relax in you head shot shoot, or could be capturing a moment in time at a corporate event.

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Timing is everything – especially at action-packed events.

The golden hour

Now I’m sure most of you will have heard of this term and many will even know what it refers to. The golden hour is (in general terms) the first hour after sunrise and the last hour before sunset where the sunlight is low in the sky, soft and golden. This lighting provides optimum conditions for both landscape images and portraiture as the contrast between highlights and shadows is not too extreme, but enough to convey shape and depth, in and around the subject matter.

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Photos taken during the golden hour have a much subtler contrast between highlights and shadows.

Feathering the light

Feathering light relates to the position of the subject in relation to the light source. Instead of aiming the light directly at the subject (or placing the subject directly in the light if using natural light), feathering the light involves placing the subject at the edge of the light source to create softer and more subtle lighting. For example, it would be the difference between standing in front of a car’s headlights, or standing on the pavement on the edge of where the headlights illuminate the space ahead. This is a popular technique across a range of photography genres, especially when seeking to create a more sensual feel to the image.

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On the edge – feathering the light can create an ethereal atmosphere in an image. Here the subject had already positioned himself on the edge of the light source and the result was too good not to photograph .

Bouncing the flash 

At events, the one question I get asked more than any other is “Why aren’t you pointing that flash in the right direction?” This answer is simple – using flash directly on a subject causes flat harsh lighting with red eyes and dark shadows. Instead, by pointing the flash to the ceiling or a nearby wall, the light is “bounced” off this larger surface and reflects back softer; creating flattering lighting. If done correctly, bounced flash can be hard to spot and is a great technique when time and lack of space may limit more complex lighting setups being utilised.

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Bouncing the flash off a ceiling or wall is far more flattering than pointing it directly at the subject. Here there are no red eyes and no distracting shadows behind.

Hyperfocal distance

Now I could I could get really nerdy here, but that’s not really my nature so I will keep it very simple. The hyperfocal distance of a scene, is the distance a photographer needs to focus his lens at, in order for everything in the image to be sharp. This usually relates to landscape photography where an object in the foreground (a gate or a wall for example) needs to be as pin sharp as the object in the background (a hill or mountain etc.). The scientific amongst us can calculate exactly what that focus needs to be based on maths and science – the rest of us use an app!!

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When everything in the scene needs to be sharp, hyperfocal focussing is the answer.

Just one more

Question: How many photographers does it take to change a lightbulb? Answer: Just one more! It’s an old joke but does highlight one of the most overused phrases in the industry. Why do we always ask for one more shot even after we have the perfect image? For some, it’s simply to really make sure the image is captured and we have several shots to choose from when editing, for others it’s a bad habit that is hard to get out of. I tend to say this when clients are starting to relax and the images are looking better and better with each shot. Sometimes the best image can be the very last one taken so whilst I don’t like keeping people longer than they feel comfortable, I like to keep trying new ideas from the start of the session to the very end.

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Just one more – taking photos can be addictive and we don’t always know when to stop!

These are just some of the strange photographic terms you may have heard or hear in the future – are there any other terms or phrases you have heard but don’t understand? If so comment below and I will endeavour to make sense of them for you.

In the meantime, have a great week.

Ross

Ross Willsher is a social (weddings and portraits) and commercial photographer based in Chelmsford and covering Essex and London, who is passionate about creating images as individual as you are.  His work can be viewed at www.rosswillsherphotography.co.uk / www.rosswillshercommercialphotography.co.uk 

facebook.com/rosswillsherphotography | @RWIllsherPhoto | instagram.com/rosswillsherphotography

 

 

“Up and over the fence” and other strange phrases used by photographers.

Relax…it’s in the bag – Part 3 – Memory Cards and Batteries

Part 3 of a series of blog posts exploring what essential pieces of kit I keep in my bag and how each item helps to make you look great in your photos.

We’ve looked at the camera, we’ve looked at the lenses and this week we’re looking at two small but crucial contents of my camera bag – memory cards and batteries.

Memory Cards

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The memory cards that I use are known as Compact Flash Cards. I use two makes; SanDisk and Lexar. Both makes are high-quality professional memory cards that are known for durability and speed. They are shock and vibration resistant and can cope in both hot and cold temperature extremes. They allow me to shoot lots of fast moving objects in quick successful when needed without freezing-up the camera or missing the shot. 

Memory cards come in a range of storage sizes – during a shoot I use several 8GB or 16GB cards instead of a single card with larger storage capabilities so that in the unlikely event of the card becoming damaged, not all of the images are lost.

What this means for you 

Using memory cards with the capacity to quickly store a high volume of large image files means that not only can we take lots of photos quickly within a limited time frame but also retain all of the photographic data to edit and enhance the images during the post-production stage. You can rest assured that if we don’t capture your good side straight away during your headshot shoot we will have plenty of opportunities to get it right before the shoot is over. We we also be able to change outfits and locations without fear of storage restrictions.

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Batteries 

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My camera batteries are long-lasting but also fully rechargeable.  Rarely – if ever – have I needed to change a dead battery mid-way through a shoot. Should this be necessary I always carry at least 3 other spare batteries on me at all times. I also carry one of my battery chargers with me just in case. 

Like the memory cards, the batteries perform just as well in extreme temperatures and are reliable in all conditions and environments – including when shooting in continuous mode for action shots. 

What this means for you

Do you have an event coming up that requires several hours coverage and features very important key note speakers? The endurance of these batteries means that every crucial shot will be captured and I won’t need to scramble around changing batteries mid-way through your guest speakers’ inspirational speeches.

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Hopefully you now understand a little bit more about what my memory cards and batteries do and how they provide peace of mind during a shoot. You can be assured that we have every eventuality covered on a shoot – be that a headshot session or event coverage. For even more reassurance, look out for my next post in the series – all about my back-up camera.

If you now feel that your promotional images are in safe hands with me and would like to contact me to book a  headshot, product or event shoot please do get in touch.

Thanks for reading – have a great week.

Ross

info@rosswillsherphotography.co.uk

www.rosswillshercommercialphotography.co.uk 

07590 520539

Relax…it’s in the bag – Part 3 – Memory Cards and Batteries

Relax – It’s in the bag: Part 2 – The Camera Lenses

Following on from last week’s blog where I talked about some of the features of my camera body and how it helps me to take great photos of you and your business, this week we are looking at my lenses and seeing just what they do for us on our shoot.

Canon 50mm f1.8

The Canon 50mm is a fixed lens meaning that it only has one focal length (and cannot be zoomed in or out). The number 1.8 refers to its largest aperture setting (the hole through which light enters the lens and into the camera). The smaller the number, the larger the aperture and therefore the more light the lens lets in. At f1.8 lots of light can flood into the camera to create the shot. This lens is small, lightweight and exceptionally sharp.

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What this means for you

Your business premises might not be the brightest and most spacious location in Essex but that doesn’t mean we can’t get some great shots for your website or social media platforms. The 50mm lens is unobtrusive, and with it’s ability to let in lots of light, we don’t have to use vast amounts of artificial lighting setups that might interrupt your workflow and take up valuable business hours.

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Canon 24-70mm f2.8

The Canon 24-70mm is a great all-round lens that can be used for wide-angle scenes and flattering portrait shots. If I only have space for one lens when ton assignments, this is the one I take as it allows me to shoot such a variety of subjects quickly and to a high quality. It can let in lots of light for hand-held shooting in dark locations but also has impressive manual focussing abilities for landscape photography on a tripod.

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What this means for you

To make your website engaging and a cut above those of your competitors, you need a variety of high quality images that provide prospective clients with a strong insight into the property, personalities and products behind the brand. This lens has the versatility to take shots ranging from exterior location images through to close-up product photography. To be able to switch quickly from a close-up image to a staff group photo helps me to save you time and get back to more pressing tasks.

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Canon 70-200mm f2.8

The largest of my lenses, the 70-200mm is great for taking shots of people and objects a little further away. It still lets in lots of light in dark environments but is also great for photographing moving subjects: be they mechanical, human or animal. The 70-200mm lens is great for creating soft blurred background as it compresses all objects in the frame.

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What this means for you

Many people are a little concerned when this large lens is pointed in their direction as they feel it will highlight all of their (perceived) flaws. In actual fact the focal length of this lens and its ability to compress objects to make them appear closer together really flatters faces. Take a headshot with a wide-angle lens and you will see how distorted and unattractive your face looks – this lens does the opposite. So don’t be intimidated by its size. This lens also helps you to really stand out from the background and make your portrait “pop”.  At events this lens allows me to capture expressions and gestures of guest speakers without obstructing your audience and attendees.

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To see some more of the work created with these lenses please take a little look at my website. Alternatively, please get in touch if you would like my lenses and I to create some images that will help you promote your USP.

In my next post I’ll be talking about memory cards and batteries and their importance. In the meantime, I’d love to hear any comments or suggestions for future posts.

Have a great week.

Ross

info@rosswillsherphotography.co.uk | www.rosswillshercommercialphotography.co.uk 07590 520539

Relax – It’s in the bag: Part 2 – The Camera Lenses

Relax…it’s in the bag: Part 1 – The Main Camera Body

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Part 1 in a series of blog posts exploring what essential pieces of kit I keep in my bag and how each item helps to promote your brand.

Over the next few weeks I’m going to be blogging about the essential items I carry in my commercial photography kit bag and how they help me to get great shots of you and your business. For part one I thought it best to start with the most obvious piece of kit – my main camera body – the Canon 5D Mark ii.

Here are 5 features of the 5D Mark ii that help me as a commercial photographer to help you sell your brand..

1. The Full-frame Sensor

A camera’s sensor size ultimately determines how much light is captured within each image. The larger the sensor, the more light that is captured in each shot.  The 5D Mark ii is fantastic for shooting in low light situations due to it’s full-frame sensor. The large sensor also helps to capture the tiniest details in highlights and shadows as well as a broad spectrum of colours and tones.

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What this means for you.

My camera can help me to capture concerts and events using only the ambient light available in the room whilst still maintaining high quality in my images.  I have and can use an external flash unit to enhance a low light scene, but often the most interesting images can be created by utilising the Canon 5D’s ability to capture brilliant detail in far from ideal natural lighting conditions. So when you book me to cover your events you need not worry about low light at the venue – I have the equipment to overcome this and take great shots.

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2. Long Battery Life

Whilst I use fully rechargeable batteries (more on these in a future blog) and always carry spares on my shoots, I have rarely – if ever – needed to replace the battery midway through a shoot. The 5D Mark ii will take 1000 to 1500 shots before the battery needs replacing so I can shoot without fear of having to stop just when we’re getting into our photographic groove!

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What this means for you.

Sometimes it may take a while to relax during your headshot shoot or we need to keep trying different angles and poses to capture your personality. The long battery life of my camera means that we only have to stop our photography shoot when we decide we have nailed the shots and not when the camera says “Enough!”

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3. Total control over every setting.

This camera lets me take full control of every aspect of each photograph – from exposure (brightness) to how much is in focus, the image’s colour balance and whether to freeze or to blur motion.

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What this means for you.

My camera helps me to ensure that the colours and tones of your products are represented accurately in all promotional material. Using the Canon 5D, I am able to light and shoot products in a way that highlights their USP and thus increases sales of your produce or stock.

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4. Interchangeable lenses

The Canon 5D – like most DSLRs – allows me to fit and use a range of lenses according to the photograph I am taking. I will talk in a future post about what each individual lens does for me (and you). Having a camera body that fits so many top-range lenses means that I can creatively shoot from a range of distances and angles and compose shots that help to promote your brand and products.

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What this means for you.

From head shots that really capture your unique personality through to wide-angle captures of your premises or event venue, being able to switch lenses to creatively capture what is important to you is a real feature of my photography style.

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5. Custom Functions

The Canon 5D Mark ii enables me to personalise which button controls each function. For example, I use a button on the back of the camera to control focussing instead of pressing down the shutter. This means that I can work in a way that suits me best and quickly make adjustments without having to stop and look at the camera body itself.

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What this means for you.

Knowing these controls so well means I can focus my attention on you. I can check that you  are feeling relaxed and happy with how the day or shoot is going. I can help to guide your posing and answer any concerns that you may have. It also means that I can work more efficiently which – due to the fact that I charge per hour – ultimately saves you money.

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So there you go – five ways in which my camera body helps me to promote your business. To see some of the work created with this camera please take a little look at my website or get in touch if you would like my camera and I to create some images that will help you promote your USP.

In my next post I’ll be talking more specifically about my lenses and how each one makes you look your best. In the meantime, I’d love to hear any comments or suggestions for future posts.

Have a great week.

Ross

info@rosswillsherphotography.co.uk | www.rosswillshercommercialphotography.co.uk 07590 520539

Relax…it’s in the bag: Part 1 – The Main Camera Body

Top Tips for Fantastic Festive Photos

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With Christmas fast approaching, many of us will be putting our cameras to good use to capture some of the excitement, magic and stress beauty that Christmas brings.  Without going into too much technical detail I have compiled some top tips to improve the look of your Christmas photos this year – whether you will be using the latest DSLR or simply the camera on your smart phone.

Decide what you want to photograph and when

Christmas brings so many fantastic photo opportunities that it can be easy to try and capture everything at once. Usually, this leads to lots of half -decent shots as we dash around from room to room and flit from portrait shots to snaps of the decorations, forgetting about settings and basic composition.  Some things will only happen once during the festive period – your children putting up their stockings or opening their presents – whilst other festive photo opportunities -the tree in your living room and the high street decorations – will be available for longer and can be taken before or after the big day itself.  So slow down and have a clear idea of what moments you want to capture at any time.  Once you know what it is you are trying to capture, the more chance you have of getting a stronger set of shots.

The shot of London at the top of this page didn’t happen by chance – I had to wait until the sun had set, remember to take a tripod so that I could get a nice sharp shot and I had to know where to stand to get the colours and reflections that I wanted in the image. Had I tried to photograph photos of Christmas shoppers, window displays and Oxford Street decorations all on the same evening, I’m pretty sure that whilst I’d have gotten more shots, very few would have had as much impact as this one.

Declutter

The success of any photo relies heavily on what you choose to include or omit from the image and the festive period can prove quite challenging when trying to avoid unwanted distractions in shots. A quick tidy up of discarded wrapping paper, used batteries and empty chocolate selection boxes can instantly improve the look of your photos and help the viewer to know exactly what it is they are meant to be looking at.

If taking portraits, it’s important to check what is cluttering or filling the background as it’s not uncommon to upload your fantastic shot of Aunt Doris and discover a sprig of mistletoe growing out of the top of her head. Chances are you’ll be annoyed with yourself and Aunt Doris won’t thank you either! If you can move your subject to a clear area do so, or try shooting from a different angle. Sometimes, however, it’s impossible to remove distracting and cluttered objects in photos and this leads to the next tip…

Go in for a close-up

If you have a digital camera, use a wide aperture (small f number), get in close and focus on the subject matter. This will blur any unwanted distractions in the background whilst at the same time help the viewer to know exactly what it is they are meant to focus their attention on. Close-up shots using any camera (including your phone) can help to highlight expressions and personalities if taking a portrait or bring out details such as colours, textures and patterns when shooting an inanimate object.  Tree decorations, frosted leaves and bows and ribbons are all good close-up material.  So get in close…and then get even closer.

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Be Original

No doubt your Facebook feed has been overloaded with shots of Christmas trees since December 1st and – as beautiful as they all are- they do start to look a bit generic after a while. So have a think about how you could shoot yours differently – think about using different angles, shooting from outside through the window or deliberately shooting out of focus. Don’t just stop with the tree; for everything you shoot think how you could capture it differently to how you normally do it. What would a super close-up shot of the brussel sprouts look like?  How different does the pile of presents look  when shooting from the floor?

Also, consider shooting things often overlooked – such as the putting up of the decorations, dad wrapping up the presents at the last minute or mum topping up the Christmas cake with brandy (again!). Just don’t get in everyone’s way whilst you do it or you could end up with very little to unwrap come the big day.

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Do More Snapping & Less Checking

Looking at your camera’s review or playback screen is useful to make sure that your settings are resulting in the photos you want, but do it after every couple of shots and you’re likely to miss so many great moments. When you only have one chance to get the shot right (such as capturing children opening their presents), sort out your settings beforehand – think about light, where people are positioned and make adjustments if necessary – then keep your finger on the shutter button (and use continuous or burst mode if you have an SLR). This will ensure that you don’t miss that moment of pure excitement (or bitter disappointment!) when the gifts are unwrapped.

If shooting a winter scene outdoors, take a short time to identify the best viewpoint, get your settings sorted and wait for the perfect moment to press the shutter – you never who or what could suddenly appear in your frame that could elevate a simple landscape into a classic Christmas card shot.

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Delegate

If you love having memories captured to treasure for years to come but are not a natural photographer, or perhaps  love photographing when you have time but Christmas always leaves you exhausted, why not get someone else to do the photography for you? Teenagers might love the opportunity to try out their new iPhone camera by snapping snoring granny, whilst handing the camera to the other other half might get them out from under your feet in the kitchen. Don’t be afraid to let someone else capture the festive memories if you think they can do a better job.

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Relax

Finally, don’t spend Christmas stressing over new techniques or capturing perfect shots. Enjoy spending time with loved ones. Relax, have fun and have a very Merry Christmas.

I’d love to see some of your festive shots. You can share them below, email info@rosswillsherphotography.co.uk or post them on my Facebook page.

I look forward to seeing you in 2016.

Ross

Ross Willsher is a social (weddings and portraits) and commercial photographer based in Chelmsford, Essex. 

www.rosswillsherphotography.co.uk

www.rosswillshercommercialphotography.co.uk

www.facebook.com/rosswillsherphotography

@RWillsherPhoto

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